Common Core ELA | Myths Versus Facts

There is a lot of hype going around about the Common Core.

Successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards requires parents, educators, policymakers, and other stakeholders to have the facts about what the standards are and what they are not.

The following myths and facts have been published by the Common Core State Standards Initiative to address common misconceptions.

Myths About Content and Quality:
English Language Arts/Literacy

Myth: The standards are just vague descriptions of skills and do not include a reading list or any other reference to content.

Fact: The standards do include sample texts that demonstrate the level of text complexity appropriate for the grade level and compatible with the learning demands set out in the standards. The exemplars of high-quality texts at each grade level provide a rich set of possibilities and have been very well received. This provides a reference point for teachers when selecting their texts, along with the flexibility to make their own decisions about what texts to use.

Myth: English teachers will be asked to teach science and social studies reading materials.

Fact: With the ELA standards, English teachers will still teach their students literature as well as literary nonfiction. However, because college and career readiness overwhelmingly focuses on complex texts outside of literature, these standards also ensure students are being prepared to read, write, and research across the curriculum, including in history and science. These goals can be achieved by ensuring that teachers in other disciplines are also focusing on reading and writing to build knowledge within their subject areas.

Myth: The standards do not have enough emphasis on fiction/literature.

Fact: The Common Core requires certain critical content for all students, including classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are made at the state and local levels. The standards require that a portion of what is read in high school should be informational text, yet the bulk of this portion will be accounted for in non-ELA disciplines that do not frequently use fictional texts. This means that stories, drama, poetry, and other literature account for the majority of reading that students will do in their ELA classes. In addition to content coverage, the standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

For more Myths Versus Facts on the Common Core State Standards, visit: http://www.corestandards.org/about-the-standards/myths-vs-facts/

7 Fun Facts About Reading

Reading one hour per day in a chosen field, will make you an international expert in 7 years!

For every year you read with your child, average lifetime earnings increase by $50,000. You make a $250,000 gift to your child from birth to age five by reading aloud, just 20 minutes a day!

By age four, high-income children have heard 45 million words from their families and low-income children have heard just 13 million.

A recent study found that people who read are two and a half times less likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Syndrome later on in life.

If a young person is read to at least three times a week, that person is twice as likely to score in the top 25% of reading.

Listening comprehension comes before reading comprehension, so you must hear a word before you can say it or read and write it.

High frequency reading parents are six times more likely to have high frequency reading children.

462268645

Say hello to our new website and Common Core Reading products!

Last month was National Reading Month, and to celebrate we released two more Common Core aligned, reading products for districts and educators to help students with their ELA programs!

Our NEW ‘Close Reading Portfolio’ provides a series of reading  material and interactive exercises that gives students practice in deriving central ideas and key supporting points in their reading material.

Banner1

And the NEW ‘Books & Collections’ library comprises nearly 500 English and Spanish titles, and was developed to provide supplemental, grade specific, reading material in History/Social Science and Science topics.

Banner2A

In addition to the above, our popular ‘Guided Reading Program’ is still available on our redesigned website and provides over 130 engaging books and lesson plans, covering comprehension strategies, oral fluency skills, and content in history, science, and language arts.

Banner3

 

Free Published Books Released for National Reading Month

But that’s not all… we are also releasing 3 free books in digital format to share with your students!

Just click on the links below to download your free books:

The Golden State, by Susanne Herfurth & Sue Byers, Illustrations by J.R.Craig & Sou Saetern

Ideal for 4th grade, readers can learn about California from this informational text, which includes interesting facts and features about the state.

American Immigrants, by Tony Losongco, Illustrations by Paul Klepac

Written for 5th graders, this non-fiction compares and contrasts the experiences of new Americans during two historical periods of immigration.

Weather, by Michael Contreras, Illustrations by Rae Mendiola

6th graders will love the graphic features in this book that will help them interpret maps and other weather graphics.

Enjoy your classroom reading and don’t forget to share this post with your friends!