How to Get Kids to Read Independently

The Scholastic Kids & Family Reading ReportTM: Fifth Edition is out and offers a snapshot of where young people are when it comes to reading independently.

Here are some of the findings of a nationally representative survey conducted last fall by Scholastic in conjunction with YouGov. Some of the results are surprising, including the fact that kids prefer to read books in print.

Following the findings is an analysis of what they mean for parents and teachers:

The State of Kids & Reading

  • Half of all children ages 6–17 (51%) are currently reading a book for fun and another one in five (20%) just finished one.
  • Both parents of children ages 6–17 (71%) and kids (54%) rank strong reading skills as the most important skill a child should have. Yet while 86% of parents say reading books for fun is extremely or very important, only 46% of kids say the same.
  • Three-quarters of parents with children ages 6–17 (75%) agree “I wish my child would read more books for fun,” and 71% agree “I wish my child would do more things that did not involve screen time.

Spotlight: What Makes Frequent Readers

  • Frequent readers, defined as children who read books for fun 5–7 days a week, differ substantially in a number of ways from infrequent readers—those who read books for fun less than one day a week. For instance, 97% of frequent readers ages 6–17 say they are currently reading a book for fun or have just finished one, while 75% of infrequent readers say they haven’t read a book for fun in a while.
  • Children ages 6–11 who are frequent readers read an average of 43.4 books per year, whereas infrequent readers in this age group read only 21.1 books annually. An even more profound difference occurs among children ages 12–17, with frequent readers reading 39.6 books annually and infrequent readers reading only 4.7 books per year.

Click here to read the full article

 

We love reading quotes

 

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We love reading! And we love people who love reading too. So we’ve compiled a list of our favorite quotes on reading for you to enjoy and share with your classroom.

“We read to know we’re not alone.” William Nicholson

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.” Groucho Marx

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” Dr. Seuss

“A children’s story that can only be enjoyed by children is not a good children’s story in the slightest.” C.S. Lewis

“We are the children of a technological age. We have found streamlined ways of doing much of our routine work. Printing is no longer the only way of reproducing books. Reading them, however, has not changed.” Lawrence Clark Powell

“There’s so much more to a book than just the reading.” Maurice Sendak

“A book is a dream that you hold in your hand.” Neil Gaiman

“There are many little ways to enlarge your child’s world. Love of books is the best of all.” Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

“A good novel tells us the truth about its hero; but a bad novel tells us the truth about its author.” Gilbert K. Chesterton

“If there is a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, you must be the one to write it.” Toni Morrison

“There is more treasure in books than in all the pirate’s loot on Treasure Island.” Walt Disney

What are some of your favorite reading quotes? Share them in the comments below!

 

Study Finds Reading to Children of All Ages Grooms Them to Read More on Their Own

Cue the hand-wringing about digital distraction: Fewer children are reading books frequently for fun, according to a new report released Thursday by Scholastic, the children’s book publisher.

In a 2014 survey of just over 1,000 children ages 6 to 17, only 31 percent said they read a book for fun almost daily, down from 37 percent four years ago.

There were some consistent patterns among the heavier readers: For the younger children — ages 6 to 11 — being read aloud to regularly and having restricted online time were correlated with frequent reading; for the older children — ages 12 to 17 — one of the largest predictors was whether they had time to read on their own during the school day.

The finding about reading aloud to children long after toddlerhood may come as a surprise to some parents who read books to children at bedtime when they were very young but then tapered off. Last summer, the American Academy of Pediatrics announced a new policy recommending that all parents read to their children from birth.

Read the full article here.